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 seat cover on 72 Bonneville
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jp 72

14 Posts

Posted - 11/16/2013 :  17:03:50  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Have a new cover which I have been reluctant to fit because I've never done this. Not a whole lot of instructions supplied. New material is a lot softer than original cover. How hard do you pull on these things? Do I want it real tight or some what loose? And was thinking of placing electrical tape at the front of pan, to ease the bottom edge it almost feels to sharp . I realize it gets covered by the plastic trim, but it appears as it could rip especially at the front corners. Do I need to cut trim flush or leave a bit longer for shrinkage? Also I am using my original seat foam mainly because it is still good, just figured its better than what I could replace it with. Any tips I sure could use them?

f scott dundas

Australia
253 Posts

Posted - 11/17/2013 :  21:50:04  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This can be difficult and if your not sure maybe take the seat, foam and cover to an auto upholstery shop and get them to do it for you. Wouldnt cost much and having a professional job done is important as the seat is such an obvious part of any restoration.
If you do it yourself put the cover in the sun for about 20 minutes so it is soft and expanded. Fit the cover over the foam when it is still warm, pull it down gently and clip in place. When it cools down it will be tight on the foam. Dont trim the cover until in place and you are happy with the fit. Scott
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Grumpy

New Zealand
542 Posts

Posted - 11/19/2013 :  02:09:47  Show Profile  Visit Grumpy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
All as Scott says except, I dont trim mine but leave untrimed and use a spot of contatc adhesive to stick to underneth the seat pan then trim back.

Not overly hard but as Scott says if you are worried take it to an auto upholster and ask if you can observe him fitting it.

Cheers,
Trev


1938 5T Replica
1966 T100 Cafe racer
1959 T20 Cub (in captivity)
Oh and one modern of another marque

My Triumphs don't bleed they are just marking their territory.
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jp 72

14 Posts

Posted - 11/19/2013 :  18:17:09  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Do you still use the metal tabs that held down the original cover and rebend them down?
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Grumpy

New Zealand
542 Posts

Posted - 11/21/2013 :  03:40:36  Show Profile  Visit Grumpy's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Use new ones.

1938 5T Replica
1966 T100 Cafe racer
1959 T20 Cub (in captivity)
Oh and one modern of another marque

My Triumphs don't bleed they are just marking their territory.
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f scott dundas

Australia
253 Posts

Posted - 11/21/2013 :  16:34:46  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you are refering to the pointed triangular tabs that are cut into the seat pan the answer is yes.
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jp 72

14 Posts

Posted - 11/23/2013 :  14:30:48  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the input guys. Have decided to have this done by a shop that specializes in seats and upholstery.


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f scott dundas

Australia
253 Posts

Posted - 11/28/2013 :  16:06:19  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good optiion mate!
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Gary

22 Posts

Posted - 12/24/2013 :  01:42:20  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the input you guys. I'm about to recover my seat and was wondering if I should attack that job myself or sub it out to an upholstery shop. I'm going to have the pan powdercoated and then take it to the upholstery shop.

Gary
1970 T120R
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JubeePrince

USA
849 Posts

Posted - 12/25/2013 :  22:50:54  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As others have said, it's not that difficult...if you have the right tools (lots of clothespins) and get everything lined up and smoothed out properly it goes quite well. I've done one seat using John Healy's tried-and-true method. His example is for a different year bike, but the mechanics are the same....

http://vintagebikemagazine.com/technical-articles/triumph-1967-1970-seat/

HTH and Merry Christmas!

Steve

'77 T140J
"Vintage Bike" What's in your garage?

"The paying customer is always right."
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RodH45

USA
126 Posts

Posted - 02/07/2014 :  16:44:58  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And not all triumph seat covers for sale out there are of decent quality. The first one I bought was a piece of junk (before I found BO). After setting it out in the sun for several hours I still tore it trying to get it on. I then bought one from BO and it fit like a glove without any straining.

RodH '68 TR6R
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f scott dundas

Australia
253 Posts

Posted - 02/09/2014 :  22:16:29  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Always best to use a good quality English made cover.There can be huge variations in quality with stuff made in India and other places.
Scott
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RodH45

USA
126 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2014 :  17:40:38  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yep you are 100% correct Scott. I sure learned the hard way.
Long time ago I ordered a few bolts from a company and they substituted my order with parts they had in stock. Lovely!

RodH '68 TR6R
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